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Talk-Torque.com » Highlight
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Friday, October 20, 2017

Archive for the ‘Highlight’ Category

CC Saloons 14th June

Posted by admin On June - 18 - 2009

Castle Combe 13th April 2009

Posted by admin On April - 18 - 2009

Well what a day the first event of the season started with thick fog which quickly cleared during the Formula Ford testing to reveal bright sunshine all day long! Not expected by many of us we all ended up either tanned or very burnt! The day was full of events with Prebble and Kilby taking pole and second in the Saloon car qualifying, to both have engine problems and not be able to compete in the main race later in the day, leaving pole empty for 3rd and 4th place for Squibb and Cox. TT’s very own Nick Charles and Jason Cooper managed to get pole in their class C and D, with Mark Wyatt in his Astra getting Pole for Class B.

Coming to the main race in bright Wiltshire sunshine all the cars left the grid to a huge collision behind the class A cars, around 6 cars were collected up in the damage including Wyatt, Wills, Bird, both of the farther and son Urqhart team and Nick Charles, the race was promptly red flagged and only Nick Charles of those involved made it back for the restart, Nick had suffered a large amount of panel damage to passanger door area but the car was deemed fit to race. After the track was promptly cleared by the Marshalls and CC team the race was back underway with Dave Kift having to retire shortly from the line with engine problems, Nick Charles starting from the pits was quick to work his way through the grid to finsh 2nd in his class with Will De Claudio to get his first win in Class C after leaving Class D last year. There was a battle for pole with Brian Cox and Barry Squibb swapping postitions several times to finally leave Barry Squibb victorious. Jason Cooper had a fight on his hands with Olly Lewis following closley behind all race until he managed to get past Cooper on lap 7, luckily Jason managed to regain the lead on lap 8 to get the Win for Class D. Unfortunatly Talk Torque’s Alan Dixon had to retire on the 3rd lap due to loss of brakes going into camp corner at 100mph! luckily Alan managed to control the car around the corner and nurse it into the pits.

So after race 1 the points look like this.

  Class A:  
Pos. Driver 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Fastest lap Total
1 Barry Squibb 2                 1 3
  2 Brian Cox 1                   1
                           
  Class B:  
Pos. Driver 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Fastest lap Total
1 Tony Dolley 6                 1 7
  2 Daryl Radford 5                   5
  3 Adrian Slade 4                   4
                           
  Class C:  
Pos. Driver 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Fastest lap Total
1 Will Di Claudio 6                   6
  2 Nick Charles 5                 1 6
  3 Nick Mizen 4                   4
  4 Carleton Williams 3                   3
  5 Anne King 2                   2
  6 Darren Hay 1                   1
                           
  Class D:  
Pos. Driver 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Fastest lap Total
1 Jason Cooper 6                   6
  2 Olly Lewis 5                 1 6
  3 Trevor Long 4                   4
  4 Russell Poynter-Brown 3                   3
  5 Jonathan Benton 2                   2
  6 Peter Weston 1                   1

Officical Timing can be found here >> http://www.tsl-timing.com/ccrc/2009/91668.pdf

Lets hope everyone manages to get their cars back to track this season and for the majority of them that they make the next race day on the 4th May.

Here is some in-car footage from the race and the 1st corner incident.

Alan’s Race Review (Monday 13th April)

Posted by admin On April - 14 - 2009

(Taken from http://www.talk-torque.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=3893&start=30)

Well that was certainly an eventful day!

Qualifying didn’t quite go to plan, oil all up avon rise and through Quarry after Kilby put a rod through his block (right infront of me!) on about lap 3 which screwed up all the lap times after that. There was also coolant/oil down on a lot of the other corners too. (Prebble, Rowls and Fergusons engines also blew!)
Unfortunately I didn’t get a good lap in before all that or on the last lap when it started to wear off so didn’t get a great great Qualy time :(

Which was probably a blessing in disguise! Off the start line of the race at folly a hugh smash in the middle of the pack (Wyatt, Wills, Charles, Bird, B Urquhart & D Urquhart all coming together) and various other wingmirrors and window smashed. Being slightly behind I squeezed through unscathed.
Red flag and restart from original positions, Days of Thunder style blind mid pack through all the cement dust at folly! lol

Then about 4 laps in, coming up to Camp corner (about 100mph) the brake peddle went straight to the floor - had no brakes! :o With ‘Oh sh1t this is gonna hurt!’ ratteling through my head somehow the car got through the corner. Stomach/heart well and truely in mouth moment. :?
Cautiously drove back round to the pits for a DNF :(
Near side front brake union came apart and hosed the fluid round my arch instead of the calliper pots, luckely non got on the tyre.

Pictures and Videos to come soon!

New Season - New Colour

Posted by admin On April - 14 - 2009

Alan Dixon revealed the new spray job for his car at the first race of the season on Monday. The class C Peugeot 306 has been repaired after last seasons mishap and is now Kawasaki Green!

Photo courtesy of Neil Dolman (MrYella)

 

More pictures and videos coming soon!

Kyle Tilley

Posted by admin On April - 13 - 2009

Kyle has been a member for some time, owning a number of different race cars over the last couple of years including a race prep’d MGB and Talbot Sunbeam, his i following in his farthers footsteps this year and will be competing in the Castle Combe Formula Ford 1600 competitions, in his newly sprayed Jamun M88. Kyle will be displaying one of yellow TT graphics in his car for the 2009 season.

 

Kyle

Welcome to Dave Kift

Posted by admin On April - 13 - 2009

More Info Coming Soon

Dave has kindly agreed to display TT graphics on his new car for 2009, this will be Dave’s third year racing in the Castle Combe Saloon Car Chamiponship, but his first year in his Peugeot 106. Dave has previously competed in his Peugeot 205.

 

davekift205

 Dave’s primary sponser is D.K. Cars and Bikes, run and owned by Dave it is a small, independent, compliant workshop located on Outskirts of Bristol City Centre. For more information please visit

http://www.dkcarsandbikes.com/

Castle Combe - Seasons First Race

Posted by admin On March - 31 - 2009

With less than a couple of weeks till the first race at Castle Combe, our competing members are busy rallying around to get there cars finished. A number of the drivers are keeping updated blogs of their progress on the site. Jason Coopers blog can be found here with lots of photos and on going progress.

Jason has recently posted the picture below

31032009943

We have a total of 5 members competing this year all displaying TT graphics, we have Alan Dixon with is 306, Jason Cooper in his Fiesta, Nick Charles in his 106, Dave Kift in his 106 and finally Kyle in his Formula Ford.

The 2009 season promises to be an interesting one.

Dyrr Ardash CCSCC Build Blog

Posted by admin On January - 31 - 2009

Taken from Dyrr’s blog on the Talk -Torque.com forum

>> http://www.talk-torque.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=3751

The story starts in 2002 when I started Sprinting and Hillclimbing my Lotus Elise. At the time it was kicking out approx 170hp (it only weighed 700kg). I had bought it as a road car, but slowly stated doing some trackdays and then got the competition bug!

That first year of competition saw me finish 1st in class and 7th overall in the Toyo Tires Midland Speed Championship. http://www.midlandspeed.org.uk/

After spending quite a bit doing up a flat to let, I had to sell the Elise and bought a 106 GTi. Still competing in the Midland Speed Championship over the next 4 years, I achieved the following results;

2003 - 5th Overall, 1st in Standard Cars 1400cc - 2000cc
2004 - 1st Overall, 1st in Standard Cars 1400cc - 2000cc
2005 - 8th Overall, 2nd in Modified Road Cars 1400cc - 2000cc
2006 - 2nd Overall, 1st in Modified Road Cars 1400cc - 2000cc

I can’t quite remember all the stats but it was something like 45 top 3 finishes in 52 events with class records broken 18 times.

The 106 had gone from looking like this;

To this;

The car was quite a beast with 185hp, weighing 860kg with a plate LSD and geared to do 116mph in top at 8000rpm!
There was more to come too, but I just could not justify it to myself as the next stage was 220hp steel crank with a Quaife dog box etc and I was already winning the class. So I decided I wanted to go racing.

I had to decide on a couple of things;
1) Which championship?
2) What car?

After much deliberation as I took a year off in 2007, I decided on the National Mobile Windscreens Castle Combe Saloon Car Championship and racing a Fiesta ST. But not a normal ST, one with only 1800cc!

The reason is to do with the class structure;
Class A - 4WD over 2000cc
Class B - 2WD 1801cc - 3000cc
Class C - 2WD 1401cc - 1800cc
Class D - 2WD upto 1400cc

A normal 2.0L ST would land you in Class B, where you would be up against some pretty hefty machinery….VAG 1.8T Ibiza, Leons etc kicking out over 350hp! together with some highly developed Astras and 206s with more than 280hp (engines for these cars were over 10K alone!)

Before anyone says why not Turbo / SC it or use a 2.3 - You can’t. Charging a car that is not normally charged is not allowed and stroking is also not allowed, so unless I had big modey to have a >270hp 2.0NA which I don’t I would not be competitive. So a 1.8 it was going to be. This can be done by sleeving the 2.0 and turning it into a 1.8L. But more of that later….

So I had to find a car. Basically any decent ST was too expensive and out of the question as I was going to pull it to pieces. I had seen a fully rally prepped 1.4 Group N rally car for sale, but they wanted £9K for it so it was too expensive, as I wanted to ideally have the whole car built for that!

At this point I sold the 106 and got £6500 for it which was not bad as at the time it was a 9 year old car, albeit one with a lot done to it!

So I found a CAT D damaged 1.25LX to start the project on in Sep 2007;

I started to repair the front damage and strip the interior;

where I had got it looking pretty good at the front;

Also at this time I started to get hold of some of the other bits I was wanting have on the car. 4 x OZ Superleggeras and 4 x Team Dynamics Pro Race 1.2s both in 17s, together with some Gaz Gold shocks (the series des not allow remote reservoir dampers and GAZ were the only ones who would add a little camber and castor into the strut for me;

After all that however, I still had a lot to do to the car when, the Rally car I had previously been interested in came up for sale again for £5.5K as a lot of the spares had been sold.

I had a quick look round it and snapped it up for £5250. It had a body off rebuild and as it came with a decent cage, H&R suspension, lots of rally bits and a Quafe ATB in it thought it was a bargain. Only problem was that it only had a 85hp 1400cc engine in it!

Here are some pics as I bought it;

So I spent some time getting rid of the 15s, rally computer, nets, co-driver setas, etc. And fiited some ST bumpers and spoiler and got it ready for the first test at Castle Combe at the end of May.

I also added a Race Technology Dash 2 & DL1 dataloggers. Essential kit in my opinion.

I had decided that I needed to get some experience racing with other cars on the track (sprinting & hillclimbing is against the clock) and I hadn’t had any real experience for some time back to when I had done a bit of competitive karting.

So I thought if the car did some reasonable lap times as 1400cc I would run it as is. The target for the day was 1min 30sec which would have qualified me for 5th in class D out of 12 for the race a couple of weeks, previous. I ended up doing a 1min 29.2, so for all of 2008 I decided to run with the 1400cc. Here’s a pic of the first test session (note it still had the rally roof vent). I think this was also the first test that Dixon had done in his car.

After that it was a case of getting ready for the first race at the end of May. The car was prepped (but I had not changed the suspension for the first race).

I knew I wasn’t really going to be that competitive as I was running with the 1400cc motor and also the car is really a bit to heavy for the 1400cc car. I estimated that the car with 20L of fuel was weighing in at approx 920Kg, which compared to the class norm of approx 800kg and about 50-70hp more meant that I was going to be well off the pace.

Anyway, it was wet throughout the day and in Qualifying I achieved 4th in class out of 9 (28th Overall out of 38), while I finished 6th in class (26th Overall) due to a spin. Here are some pics from teh first race;

Me waiting in the holding area before the race;

 

Oh dear….;

I was pretty pleased with my first race as I think I probably had the most underpowered car in the race!

I had booked 2 test session before the next race at the end of July to evaluate the GAZ shocks and try out some spring / damper settings and also a set of 15s.

The 2 tests came and went and I felt I had a reasonable setup to use and so to the next race;

I had got a bit of sponsorship! Baileigh Industrial http://www.bifabuk.co.uk/
who make metalworking tools and luckily their logo is orange, black & white. Looks quite good on the car;

Qualifying I achieved 5th in class out of 10 (27th Overall out of 34), while I finished 5th in class (22 Overall).
Again pleasing especially as I had good battle with a couple of cars over the first few laps. I also got the in-car video working for the first time….

Think it gives you an idea of how underpowered the car was even against some of the guys doing similar lap times.

I then had to take 2 months off as I was having a 2nd child - Get in the way these things!

Charlie Luc Ardash born on 3rd Sep 2008;

Back again in early October for a dry quali and then wet race. I was really pleased with my time in qualifying as it was a PB but only put me 8th in class out of 12 (31st out of 36). But a strong showing in the race meant I moved up to 5th in class (25th overall)

I also had a bit of a moment in qualifying…

In the end I finished the championship in 8th in class and 22nd overall (out of 80 or so registered competitors), considering I only competed in 3 out of 9 races that wasn’t too bad (all with 85hp!)

There are lots of mods planned for the winter…engine box, custom loom, losing some weight, new bushing exhaust too much to mention now, but all will be revealed….

All that is left is to show you how the car looked like in October;

Front of the car stripped to take 1400cc engine out

There has been quite a bit of work done on the car since then, but I guess I’ll let everyone digest all of that…

 

Torsion Bar Lowering

Posted by admin On January - 25 - 2009

TORSION BAR LOWERING BY SANDY BROWN

How Much?

The first thing you have to do is decide how much you want to lower the rear of the car. If you are fitting front lowering springs at the same time, fit them first so you can measure how much they actually drop the, rather than how much the makers claim they do. Make sure the ground is pretty level before measuring. My preferred way to do this is put a horizontal strip of masking tape on the edge of the sill near the front wheel arch and measure the height from the floor. Make a note of the height and you can compare the new height after the springs are fitted, the difference is how much it has been lowered; this is best done after a short test drive to settle the springs.

The rear of the car should be slightly higher than the front on Peugeots, 10-20mm usually to preserve turn in, lift off oversteer and acceptable weight transfer under braking. I usually try to get 10mm higher at the back on 205’s and 309’s, but 15 seems to look best on 106’s.

The car will probably already be 10-20mm higher at the back, so if you have lowered the front 35mm for example, you’ll only want lower the back by the same amount.

PLEASE NOTE:

This is a hints and tips type guide, it’s up to you to ensure the work is done properly and safely, this guide is not intended to provide complete and comprehensive advice. If you are unsure about the process in any way, seek the help of a professional! I can’t hold your hand.

Altering the ride height can affect the bias of the braking system. I strongly advise that you immediately have the front-rear brake bias checked and if necessary adjusted after altering the ride height, to ensure safe operation. (MOT stations have brake performance testing equipment suitable for this task).

Lowering the car may cause the springs to have insufficient travel, causing sudden bump stop or tyre to body contact which can have extreme and instant negative effect on the handling of the car, which could result in a loss of control with dire consequences. For this reason, extreme lowering is strongly discouraged.

Preparation

First off, while the car is on the ground, just undo the rear wheelnuts a touch, it’s easier now.

Jack the car up (preferably with a Trolley Jack under the crosstube), so that axle stands can be placed under the car. On the 106 be careful not to damage the fuel tank with the Jack. Do not undertake this job without axle stands.

1

 

 

Note the axle stands are mounted well clear of the dampers etc, so they don’t get in the way. The 205 is pictured, the fuel tank makes this awkward in the 106, so put them under the rear jacking points on the sills.

Lower the car onto the axle stands ensuring they don’t tilt.

Remove the rear wheels.

Dampers

Shocks as they are commonly known (this is not technically the correct name). Some people leave them on when lowering, but you should remove them for this method. The damper bolt threads will will be quite rusty on 205/306/309 and may need to be replaced after violent removal! If you re-use them, clean the bolt threads as best you can first with a wire brush.

On 205/306/309 undo the 18mm nut on the top bolt using an 18mm spanner on the bolt and 18mm socket and ratchet on the nut, this may be easier if you remove the spare wheel, the exhaust backbox may also be in the way. Remove the bolt. Undo the 21mm nut on the lower damper bolt and use a punch and hammer to knock the bolt out, do not hammer the thread, it’ll get damaged and take care not to bend the brake pipe. Remove the Damper.

2

205 Damper nuts

On 106 undo the 18mm nut on the top bolt using an 18mm spanner on the bolt and 18mm socket and ratchet on the nut, this may be easier if you remove the spare wheel, the exhaust backbox may also be in the way. Undo the 21mm nut on the lower damper bolt and if the damper won’t come off use a punch and hammer to knock the bolts out, do not hammer the thread, it’ll get damaged.

3

106 Damper nuts

Measure The Damper Bolt Centres

For this method of lowering, you need to know the distance between the Damper bolt holes before you remove the Torsion Bars. Support the Trailing Arm’s weight slightly and use a ruler or tape measure to measure the distance between the bolt hole centres.

4

106 driver’s side shown 205/306/309etc similar.

Anti Roll Bar

The Anti Roll Bar (ARB) is connected to each trailing arm by a splined plate secured by a 13mm bolt. You only need to remove the bolt from one end of the ARB to disconnect it, driver’s side on the 106, passenger’s side on 205/306/309.

If you want to remove the rear ARB (optional, not essential unless the trailing arms need to be removed):

Undo the nylon bolt (Torx or Allen headed depending on year).

5

Nylon bolt in ARB end plate

Now you need to get a bolt with exactly the same thread as the nylon one (M12×1.50) and about 50mm long minimum, screw it into the hole finger tight. Remove the 13mm bolt from the other end of the plate. Now tighten the big bolt in the hole and it will “press” the plate off the ARB.

6

Here’s the end plate removed from the ARB

Unbolting The Torsion Bars

106- On each end of the Torsion Bars there are Torx bolts and eccentric (offset) washers to be removed.

205/306/309- There are Torx bolts and eccentric (offset) washers on the outer ends, and 13mm nuts and plain washers on the inner ends.

 

7

106 Passenger’s side shown, Driver’s side similar.

Make sure you have a good quality T40 Torx bit for these bolts, as they are easily damaged, which will seriously complicate the job!! If they do prove difficult to undo (quite likely) then use a flat blade chisel and hammer on the edge of the bolt to shock it undone, but the bolt may not be re-useable. Then remove the eccentric washer by tapping it into the middle of the hole with a chisel (gently) and “tip” it out as shown below, if it’s difficult, then it may still be in the groove. Clean away any rust from around the washer and try again.

8

”Tipping” out the eccentric washer

205/306/309- Remove the 13mm nut and washers from the inner ends of the Torsion Bars.

Removing The Torsion Bars

This is the difficult bit, if they have been removed before and greased, then it can be really easy, but usually it is quite difficult and will wear down your will to “lower”! But I’ll do my best to guide you…

First of all, support the trailing arm’s weight on the side you are removing, on 106 the front bar is passenger’s side and the rear bar is drivers side, on 205/306/309 it’s the other way round! (Don’t know why, pug logic.)

If you have a slide hammer available, attach it to an M8×1.25 bolt or stud threaded deep into the outer end of the Torsion Bar and bang it out, but take care that the trailing arm doesn’t come out of the crosstube, if it does then I’ll cover that in a minute. I don’t like using a slide hammer myself, as it often damages the thread inside the bar from the impact load, making life harder later, but it’s up to you.

Otherwise I recommend using a long M8×1.25 bolt or stud with a nut, large washer and large socket (bigger inside that the end of the Torsion Bar), to “pull” the Torsion Bar out. This method is highly effective, but gentler and quieter!

9

The Torsion Bar is out in this picture, but hopefully you can see how it works, you screw the Bolt all the way into the Torsion Bar, then tighten the Nut which pulls the Bar against the Socket etc.

If the nut becomes tight and it seems to be going nowhere, hit the torsion bar with a hammer behind the trailing arm to shock it and the preload of the nut should move it slightly, retighten the nut and hammer again, this is slow, but the only way.

If the Bar still won’t budge, then chances are the inner end will come free, allowing the trailing arm to be removed once the brakes have been disconnected (rear callipers can simply be unbolted, but drums will need the hose unbolted and be bled after).

Using a gas torch to heat the trailing arm/torsion bar up on the car I’d not recommend, due to the proximity of the fuel tank. Remove it first in my opinion!

To remove the torsion bar by force once off the car, (205/306/309- remove the screw stud from the end of the torsion bar first), screw a suitable bolt (pug seat bolts are perfect) and a large washer into the end of the bar to protect it, stand the torsion bar upright with the arm on a block of wood as shown below and belt the crap out of the bolt on the end. This method has never failed me yet. As shown below…

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Victory is sweet!

Refit the trailing arm if you used the method above, taking care not to damage the bearings in the crosstube as the arm is inserted, if it need more than shove to go in, it’s not right.

205/306/309- refit the screw stud into the end of the torsion bar and finger tighten.

Once both torsion bars are free from their splines, freshen up the splines with a wire brush to remove rust and grease them thoroughly ready for re-fitting.

Now’s a good time for a tea break, so you have a clear head for the technical bit.

Setting The Torsion Bars

This is the crucial bit. The first thing you need to now is that the rear dampers (shocks) move at 1/3rds the rate of the height, so if the car drops 30mm the damper moves 10mm. Since the spring rate of the torsion bar stays as good as the same whatever height you set it at; you can simply reduce the idle damper measurement by 1/3rds the amount you want to lower the car, and refit the torsion bars there and a new ride height is set. The adjustment of the torsion bars isn’t quite infinite, but about 3mm increments. Remember what measurement you recorded for the damper hole centres.

Example: (Starting from 348mm Damper setting (309 gti standard))

Lowering by 30mm, 1/3rds of 30 is 10, so reduce damper setting by 10mm.

Original damper measurement 348mm, minus 10mm, equals 338mm.

So you need in this example to fix the damper holes 338mm apart to ensure the torsion bars are set right. To do this, either drill a piece of wood with two 16mm holes the correct distance apart (between hole centres), which works fine or my latest discovery is that a 205/309 gear linkage cross rod (the longer one) makes a great adjustable dummy damper once you’ve knocked the nylon bushes out! As shown below:

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205/309 gear linkage cross rod makes great dummy shock, for setting the ride height!

Fit the special tool piece of wood or rod in place of the Damper, using the Damper bolts to hold it in position (no nuts required). Then slide the torsion bar on that side into its holes, and try to push in into the splines by hand, but you’ll need to keep turning it on one spline and trying again until you find the spline it just slides in on, if you have to use force to get it in then it’s probably not the right spline! Once you’ve found the right spline, you will most likely need to tap it in the last little bit with a punch and hammer, but if it needs a whack, something is wrong, remove it and try again. Make sure the bar is in far enough for the eccentric washer to be fitted on the outer end (the trailing arm end) and refit the washer and Torx bolt, then tighten the Torx bolt which will pull the torsion bar against the washer. Grease the bolt head thoroughly.

Don’t over tighten the Torx bolts, you’ll regret it next time!

106- Fit the Torx bolt and washer on the inner end of that torsion bar.

205/309- unscrew the screw stud on the inner end of the torsion bar until it stops, then refit the 13mm locknut on it and tighten the nut whilst holding the screw tight with a screwdriver.

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205/306/309 inner end of torsion bar

Remove the special tool wood or bar and fit on the other side and repeat the process.

Refit ARB End Plate (If you opted to remove it)

Once the special tool wood or rod has been removed, it’s time to refit the ARB end plate. It has to go on the right spline so as you position it on the splines, line it up by putting a screwdriver or stud through the small hole into the trailing arm, as shown below:

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309 shown

Find the bolt, nut, socket and washers you used earlier to pull out the bars and screw them into the end of the ARB through the large hole in the end plate. Now tighten the nut to press the end plate onto the ARB.

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Using a bolt and nut to press on the end plate, I’m not using the socket in this picture or a long bolt, but the effect is the same on the 309.

The small bolt hole on the end plate should line up exactly, if it’s only slightly out, the bars may have sagged or the Axle twisted slightly over time, but if it’s hard to get the bolt in, then either the ARB plate isn’t on the right spline if you’ve removed it, (press it off and refit it) or one torsion bar has been set differently to the other and you must unfortunately go back and rest one bar to match the other L.

Refitting The Dampers

Refit both Dampers with the bolts and nuts slightly undone, enough that you can turn them still with your fingers. Now put the jack under one trailing arm and jack it up until it just lifts the car off the axle stand on that side. Now tighten the Damper nuts, being careful not to rock the car, as it’s not very well supported at this stage! Remove the Jack and repeat on the other side. This method ensures the Damper bushes aren’t twisted when the car is driving normally, so the ride is better and the bushes won’t shear from stress. Refit the calipers or brake lines if you had to remove them earlier, and bleed the brakes if the hoses were disconnected.

Finishing Off

Refit the rear wheels and torque the wheel bolts, refit the spare wheel and/or backbox if you removed either. Jack the car up on the Crosstube, remove the axle stands and lower the car carefully onto the floor. Let off the handbrake and bounce the car a few times before checking the ride height is a) what you wanted and b) the same on both sides within 10mm. Now test drive the car to make sure there are no strange noises, and don’t forget that if the brakes have been bled they make not bite first time!! Hopefully it’ll look right and handle right.

Please remember you do this entirely at your own risk, I have done my best to explain it well and I have assumed a certain amount of common sense and ability. If you are unsure, take no chances and have a professional check your work. Also bear in mind that the handling characteristics and braking ability of the car may be affected, therefore it’s important you drive with this in mind and inform your insurer of the modifications. Good luck. Sandy Brown 2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Autosport International

Posted by admin On January - 18 - 2009

With 2009 just upon us it was time for the motorsport fans annual pilgrimage to the Birmingham NEC and autosport international. Many Talk Torque members attended the show over the 3 days, some looking for inspiration for their race / track day projects, others to just fuel their motorsport obsession. For me its a great opportunity to photograph some cars that I would never be able to get that close to anywhere else. The 2009 show was teamed up with the Pistons Heads show which allowed a selection of their members to show of their cars, they had a nice selection of cars from minis, to Porsche’s and TVR’s. As usual the show had much to offer to motorsport fans, David Coulthard, Murrey Walker, Martin Brundle and Allan McNish among others were in attendance, there was an exhibition of David Coulthards career all the way from karting through to his final Red Ball racing F1 car. There was also the usual display of formula one cars. The live action arena displayed the usual adrenaline fueled in door racing and as ever was the centre piece to the show.

 

Feel free to flick through some of my photos from the day.

Barry Coombs